Distinctive Dallas Wedding Photography by Marcus

Wedding Ceremony Photo Checklist

Our list of Traditional Dallas Wedding Photos our photographers take:
In addition to candid photo and images of spontaneous fun, our wedding photography includes the following common traditional photos.

At the Church prior to the Dallas Wedding Ceremony

  • Mother or Maid of Honor adjusting veil
  • Bride putting on Garter with Bridesmaids looking on
  • Bride in dressing room with mirror
  • Portrait of Mother and Bride
  • Portrait of Father and Bride
  • Bride and Maid of Honor
  • Bride and Bridesmaids
  • Bride pinning corsage on Mother
  • Bride pinning corsage on Father
  • Flower Girl handing bouquet to Bride
  • Brothers and Sisters and Bride
  • Bride’s Mother on Usher’s arm
  • Groom and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Best Man
  • Best Man adjusting Groom’s tie
  • Groom and Father (shaking hands)
  • Groom and Groom’s Parents
  • Groom’s Mother on Usher’s arm
  • Other people being accompanied down the aisle

 

During the Ceremony

  • Bride escorted down the aisle by Father
  • Father giving away the Bride
  • Selected shots during the Ceremony
  • A timed exposure of overall Ceremony

 

After or Before the Ceremony at the Church

  • Bride and Groom coming down the aisle
  • Wedding Party coming down the aisle
  • Groom kissing the Bride at the Altar
  • Exchanging of the Rings
  • Bride and Bridesmaids
  • Bride and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Bridesmaids
  • Bride and Maid of Honor
  • Groom and Best Man
  • Entire Wedding Party
  • Entire Wedding Party with Clergy
  • Bride with Parents
  • Bride with Parents and In-Laws
  • Groom with Parents
  • Groom with Parents and In-Laws
  • Bride and Groom with Parents
  • Bride and Groom with Grandparents

 

At the Reception

  • The receiving Line
  • Wedding Cake (prior to being cut)
  • Guests signing book
  • Introduction of the Wedding Party
  • Wedding Party making Toasts
  • Bride and Groom making Toasts
  • Bride and Father Dance
  • Groom and Mother Dance
  • Candid Dancing shots
  • The bouquet Toss
  • Groom removing Garter
  • Groom throwing Garter
  • Cutting the Cake
  • Feeding the Cake to one another

 


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Tying the Knot: The Complete Wedding Organizer

From “Yes to I Do” to “Happily Ever After”, when it comes to tying the knot, the complete wedding organizer answers all your questions. Rest assured, whether you choose Wedding Photographer Dallas’ OrchidLily or Magnolia Wedding Photo packages, your wedding photos will go smoothly and professionally.

With the purchase of wedding photography, you will receive complimentary consultation from My Wedding Organizer to plan your wedding on:

  • Bridal Gown / Wedding Dress 
  • Dallas Wedding Locations
  • Dallas Wedding Portrait Locations
  • Dallas Wedding DJ
  • Dallas Wedding Cake
  • Dallas Wedding Videography / Videographer 
  • Dallas Wedding Ceremony Tips

Our comprehensive guide to wedding planning and services, including caterers, photographer, videographer, and other wedding professionals. Our practical advice will sweep you off your feet from your engagement to when you tie the knot on your wedding day — looking calm, cool and beautiful!

 


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Budget Wedding Photo Priorities

Your Wedding Memories: A Matter Of Priorities

For brides and grooms in Dallas who are watching their costs, planning a wedding usually involves making a few tradeoffs in selecting the venue, the number of guests, the food, entertainment and, of course, the photography. But ultimately, the measurement of that special day is not tied to the luxury of the setting or headstones of the cake, but to the precious memories that are created and preserved.

For many of these Dallas couples, skillful wedding photojournalism is a way to assure that the touching and profound photos from their wedding are captured — regardless of where the event is held, or how much money is spent on accoutrements. This is a critical consideration for anyone planning a wedding on a budget.

Every bride has her unique priorities. Some brides dream their whole life about a wedding dress, so they will put a high priority on that. For others it’s photography, because that’s what lasts. It ’s your own personal wedding memories, but great wedding photography is also about sharing with others — into future generations.
When all is said and done, many of those costly trappings of the day — food, flowers, decorations are going to be gone the moment the date has passed. Certainly, you want to enjoy the experience and have a nice party for people, but the photos are going to be there forever.

No matter how nice the environment or flowers are, favorable photography conditions always trump sheer luxury or scenic drama when it comes to capturing those memories. Dive photographed weddings where the lighting was bad, the crowd was thick, and the time was too short, so those factors are just as important as the environment or scenery itself. But when I share the wedding photos, none of that is remembered — just the moment I capture as a photographer.

THE SKILL OF CAPTURING MEMORIES

Make sure that whatever money you do allocate to photography is money well spent. The most experienced wedding photographer is a true expert at preserving those special moments — even when the setting or venue may not be anything close to ideal.

We make your wedding photos into an ideal photojournalistic event full of all the beauty, love, spontaneity, emotion and action. We were recently challenged by a wedding in a windery painted in muted, dark tones, with little natural light, followed by a reception at a rather dark meeting hall. Although the conditions were budget, the result, thankfully, were prints described as “incredibly beautiful.”

Our brides are definitely getting value, regardless of whether they choose our OrchidLily or Magnolia wedding photography package.

FOCUSING ON THE ESSENCE

Your wedding location is a background element used only to frame and accentuate the bride and groom. The simpler it is, the better I can focus the attention on my human subjects and the touching moments happening.

FOLLOWING THROUGH ON PRIORITIES

When juggling wedding costs, It is all about considering what is really important and staying true to your priorities. Don’t trust your irreplaceable memories to just anyone. And those priorities are ultimately about the value of memories.

In surveys, of newlyweds on their 1-year anniversary, when asked what was the #1 thing they would have changed, at the top of the list is “I would have spent more on my wedding photography.”

When the flowers are gone, the cake is eaten, the dress is in storage – your wedding photos and memories will last forever.

 


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7 Tips For Better Wedding Photos

Professional wedding photography requires some serious training. Here are some free tips so you can take better wedding photos.
 
In this article we don’t intend to turn you into a professional Dallas wedding photographer. Rather, we assume you may be a guest at some wedding soon, you want to bring your camera along, and you hope to capture a few great photos of the Bride and Groom and your friends and family.
 
Wedding Photography Tip One:
 
Stay out of the way of the professional photographer. 
 
Chances are, the couple that is getting married has spent money to hire a reputable professional. The wedding photographer has a big job to do – and a big responsibility to do it right and get all the important shots – all in a limited time. So you don’t want to get in the professional’s way and hamper his or her activities.
 

For example, if the photographer is taking posed portraits of the bride, the groom, or their family members, don’t try to also take a photo of each pose the photographer sets up. He or she is doing a job. You and your camera will certainly be in the way, even if you try to be unobtrusive. What’s more, the pro wants to sell a print of each pose to the couple. Chances are, with the equipment that he or she is using, the results will be great, and the couple will still buy a photo from the pro even though you take the same shot. But, if you offer the same shot free to the couple – based on the pose and lighting the pro set up – the wedding photographer may lose a sale. This isn’t fair. It’s his pose. It’s his lighting. It should be his print!

In addition, if you’re taking pictures off to one side of the pro, you’ll distract some members of the wedding party and slow down the whole process.

So don’t interfere with the wedding photographer’s posed pictures. Don’t worry, you’ll have lots and lots of other opportunities!

Wedding Photography Tip Two:

If you want to take pictures in the church, sit in an aisle seat. Chances are you won’t take many pictures before the ceremony – after all, you’re a guest (or perhaps a member of the wedding party). So you’ll be plenty busy before the ceremony socializing, and then taking your seat and waiting for the ceremony to get underway. Let’s assume, however, that you have your camera with you and you want to take some pictures during the ceremony.

But don’t start firing away until you know what’s permitted and what’s not permitted in that particular house of worship. Understand, some ministers, priests, and rabbis don’t care a hoot about cameras and flashes. They expect the pro and the guests to blaze away during the ceremony. However, others permit pictures, but not flash.

How to know? Our advice is to watch the professional wedding photographer. We will know the Rules of the Wedding Facility. If we are moving freely about the church and using a flash on camera, then chances are you can take some flash-pictures too. If he takes pictures, but doesn’t use flash, you can probably do the same. If other guests start to take pictures as the bride goes down the aisle, and the minister doesn’t say something at the start of the ceremony, then you may as well join in.

Assuming it’s OK to take pictures, then, our tip is that you seat yourself along the center aisle.

Wedding Photography Tip Three:

Actually, this “Tip” offers two wedding photo tips concerning the important shots to get “at the church.”

  1. Should you try to photograph during the wedding ceremony’s cherished moments like the “I do’s,” the slipping on of the wedding ring, the first kiss, the blessing, or (at Jewish weddings) the breaking of the glass? This really depends upon how close you are to the action. A good picture should pretty much fill the frame with the action. If you’re seated way back and you’re not using a telephoto lens, the likelihood is that the bride and groom will be mere specks in your picture. If so, our advice is to either forego taking any shots during the ceremony (no law says you can’t just sit back and enjoy the moment) or take a shot or two “for memory’s sake.” If, on the other hand, it’s a small wedding and you can get close to the action and fill the frame, by all means take the shots!
  2. While you can photograph them coming down the aisle before the ceremony, your best shots will be when they come back up the aisle after the ceremony. Here’s why. First, the bride and the groom traditionally come down the aisle separately before the ceremony. While there’s nothing wrong with getting pictures of them individually as they enter, remember that you will have the back of the church as your background. Second, don’t bother to take pictures after they pass you. You want to capture the expressions on their faces, not the back of their heads.

But you definitely want to capture them coming up the aisle after the ceremony. You’ll get their happy expressions. You’ll have the altar as your background. And the Happy Couple will undoubtedly look less nervous and more radiant.

Wedding Photography Tip Four:

Many of the best pictures taken at weddings are portraits. In today’s fast-paced society, there are only a few events that cause families to gather together – mainly, weddings. Our weddings are joyous occasions, and offer you lots of opportunities to take pictures of family and friends.

People make the wedding and the party that follows. And when it comes to “people pictures” you’ve got great opportunities. We said earlier that you’ll be able to take great photos at the event that the pro won’t. Among these opportunities are portraits of friends and family. After all, you know them, you know who’s near-and-dear to you – and the pro doesn’t. So here’s your chance to shine. They’re all dressed up and having a good time, and you have nearly unlimited photo opportunities.

Most of these opportunities occur at the reception after the wedding. When you want to shoot a person or a small group, give them a moment to get composed.

If you’re photographing a group at a table (more on this in a moment), wait till they finish chewing, take the glasses and cutlery out of their hands, watch out for clutter in the foreground, and use your flash.

Whenever you photograph two or more people together, try to show a relationship between them. Get them close together. If you’re taking a picture of a parent and child, have one put an arm around the other. Have family members show affection for each other.

Whenever you take a portrait of a person or group, get up close and fill the frame with your subjects.

Wedding Photography Tip Five:

Set up “table shots” the way the pros do. Professional “table shots” – the shots of each table of guests seated at the reception meal – are rarely purchased by the Happy Couple.

Here’s another opportunity for you and your camera. Chances are you know some or all of the people with whom you’re seated. So why not take a picture of them? Here’s how to handle it like a pro: Ask about half of the guests seated at the table to leave their seats and stand behind the other half of the guests. In other words, clear one side of the table and have the people from that side stand behind the people on other side, who remain seated. If you’ve got some elderly guests at the table, let them stay seated and move the younger ones in behind them.

By moving half the people out of their seats, you’ll be able to fill your horizontal frame with two rows of people. But be careful here. Avoid showing the entire table in the foreground – it’s probably a mess! Instead, concentrate on filling the frame of your photo with people, and eliminate the clutter on the table by not showing the tablecloth, dirty dishes, smudged napkins, etc.

Wedding Photography Tip Six.

It has become common place to put a cardboard disposable camera, usually the type that includes a built-in flash unit, on each table at the reception with the idea that the guests at that table will use it at their table, and the bride and groom will develop the film and have the spontaneous photos that are created to enjoy and possibly augment their wedding album.

The problem is that at many weddings no one gets the ball rolling. Or the guest who does take up the camera doesn’t know how to take good pictures with it. Since you know what to do, we suggest you take command. Show the other people at your table who express any interest how to charge the flash, how to advance the film, take a few pictures yourself, and then pass the camera to someone else.

Encourage the other users to get close and fill the frame with the subject. Warn them, however, that the cardboard cameras probably can’t focus closer than four feet and that the flash is only good out to about twelve feet. So alert them to stay in that range when they use the camera. You’ll be doing the bride and groom a real service and they’ll be grateful, even if they never know the effort you made.

Wedding Photography Tip Seven:

While you may want to capture those “scripted” moments like the wedding toasts, the cake cutting, and the bouquet-tossing, you may be better off turning away from the action and capturing “reaction” shots of the faces of guests.

A wedding reception is a party. There’s lots of food and music and dancing. But most of the action is hard to photograph, so we have suggested you concentrate on portraits. What about those “scripted” moments like the Best Man’s toast, or the cake cutting, or the bride’s bouquet toss?

At these moments, you have two choices: You can, if you like, try to capture them with your camera. But your pictures are likely to be duplicates of what the pro captures. A better idea might be to concentrate on the faces of family members and friends during these important moments. Aim to capture “reaction shots,” that is, candid portrait photos of people feeling strong emotion as they watch their loved ones at this important moment. Here’s a perfect opportunity for you to capture some great shots!

If you follow these seven Tips, you’ll get great results at the weddings you attend. If you’re planning on using a digital camera, don’t miss our article on Using a Digital Camera at a Wedding. So bring along your camera…and enjoy.

Contact us at 972-822-3587 to schedule your Dallas wedding photography.


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What To Look For in Your Wedding Photographer

Photography Style - Do you like the photographer’s photography style? When you see a portfolio of previous work he/she has done, can you picture yourself in that specific photographic style?

Would you like yourself photographed in the same way? Is there enough variety in the photographer’s style to give you the photographs you want? Call us and we will meet with you and show portfolios and answer all your questions!

Experience - Make sure the photographer has had experience professionally photographing other weddings. Does he/she do this for a living or as a hobby?

Your wedding day photos come once in a lifetime and are too important to trust in the hands of a friend hobbyist. We have 10 years experience photographing weddings in all kinds of settings and lighting conditions, so we know how to bring out the best in your wedding photos.

Personality - Make sure that the comfort level is there between you and the photographer. You want to make sure that the photographer’s personality is there to compliment your special day. Maybe even give you encouragement to strike a pose or feel more free and enjoyable!

 


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Dallas Destination Wedding Photography

Dallas Texas is a favorite destination wedding spot — not only known for its selection of many wedding venues, but also for its large, welcoming heart. Dallas Texas destination brides and groom can choose from a wonderful selection of wedding locations to make your celebration spectacular, captured in quality by your wedding photographer – numerous hotels, beautiful churches and gorgeous halls that span a variety of tastes and pricings.

The greater Dallas region is a wedding destination that couples will love. Entertainment and sports venues are in plenty in this city. Dallas has lots of varied architecture, giving you unique wedding photography location ideas for your wedding photographer to shoot your unforgettable wedding pictures. With a Dallas destination wedding, you have the option of hosting your wedding in the beautiful city life or in the lush countryside.

Everything in Dallas says “big”, from its land to its heart, which means that no matter how you decide to celebrate your wedding, you will certainly have many big moments captured in picture by your professional wedding photographer.

 


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Today’s Wedding Photography Trends

Leafing through glossy magazines in 1940s and ’50s, engaged couples began to see something new — candid, intimate photographs of celebrity and royal weddings taken by photojournalists. Sure, there were formal poses, but many photos captured the moment, for better or worse. :)

Dallas Wedding Photographer

In 1956 magazines worldwide gave the royal treatment to the grand wedding of actress Grace Kelly to Prince Rainier of Monaco, devoting full-page spreads to candid moments, such as a pensive Princess Grace gazing over a balcony before the ceremony and the couple exchanging rings.

Invite photojournalists to your wedding and they’ll do what they do best — record the moment with candid, humorous, touching photos. Artful images of unfettered moments have universal appeal, and these early photographs helped spark a new genre of Dallas wedding photography. Decades later this documentary approach has evolved to what it is now: a popular option in wedding photography that captures the story behind the ceremony. Today it’s available to everyone, not just celebrities, and our photojournalistic wedding photography shows it best.

Mark Kaiser, a Dallas, Texas wedding photographer, has earned a degree in fine art, but primarily photographs weddings and bridal portraits. He got into wedding photography when he took his photography hobby to some friends weddings and the feedback was always the same – “these wedding photos are better than from our professional photographer.”

Today, my years of experience help me know when a “perfect moment” is around the corner. I am poised with my camera, ready to capture that instant.

trends-02Capturing real moments on one of the most transforming days in people’s lives is what wedding photography is about for Covenant Photography of Dallas. Mark’s fine art training taught him to create images that transcend the ordinary to become amazing, so that anyone looking at his powerful wedding pictures will be moved.

Whereas traditional wedding photography follows a common script for wedding photos, a mixture of photojournalistic style takes advantage of unscripted moments in order to best tell the story.

Today, we credit brides and grooms for furthering the development of wedding photojournalism photography. “Weddings are exciting to shoot today because people are so visual now,” he says, and that carries over to location, fashion, and details, like flowers. “People want art photos. They want something better than their parent’s wedding pictures.”

Wedding Photographer Dallas allows the view to “go behind the scenes” as it were and be a true participant in the adventure and joy of covenant love called “Dallas Wedding.”

Call us at 972-822-3587 to reserve your special day.

 


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Using a Digital Camera at Weddings

At the wedding, the “fun factor” of digital includes instant results and the opportunity to share moments from an event while the event is still ongoing. So, without further ado, here are our Tips for Great Digital Wedding Photos.

Just like we mentioned in our companion piece, 7 Tips for Best Wedding Pictures, this article is designed to help you, the wedding guest, capture great photos with your digital point-and-shoot camera. Our goal is not to turn you into a professional Dallas wedding photographer. Rather, we’ll help you understand the issues you’ll face when you try to take digital photos at any of the affairs you’re likely to attend as a guest this wedding season.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 1:

Take plenty of camera batteries and memory cards. Due to issues with wedding flash recycling time and shutter lag that are inherent in digital cameras, you’re likely to be taking many more photos at the reception than you may think, since many of them may not come out, some one may move or blink, etc… . Consequently, you’ll be draining your camera’s batteries by not only taking the photos, but by reviewing them during the reception.

Which brings us to the second part of this tip: bringing as much memory with you as possible. The more memory cards you have with you, the less likely you’ll be to miss the party as you sit in your chair trying to find space on your card for one more picture. You know… that all important one of your best friend getting hit in the head with the bridal bouquet. The one picture you can’t possibly miss! So, plan ahead and bring more than you think you’ll need in both memory cards and batteries.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 2:

Take advantage of your camera’s ability to change ISO. Many point-and-shoot cameras are set automatically so that they expose much like a traditional camera loaded with 100 ISO film. This is great for outdoor photos, but may be woefully inadequate inside a reception hall or church even with the flash turned on. However, unlike traditional film-based point-and-shoots, many digital cameras are more sophisticated and allow the photographer to set higher ISO ratings. If you find that the backgrounds of your photos are coming out dark, even with the flash on, try boosting the ISO setting on your digital camera to 200 or 400. While you may pay for this increase in gain with some graininess, color shifts, and artifacts, you’ll find that the backgrounds will be much lighter and the on-camera flash will appear to work much better.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 3:

Don’t expect too much from your flash. Any less-than-professional on-camera flash tends to be woefully inadequate, but it’s still better than nothing. Just remember that the flash is not likely to cover a lot of distance, leaving much of the background in your photos dark. To compensate, try adjusting the camera’s ISO setting, and remember to place your subjects up close to fill as much of the frame as possible. Don’t expect to get great group shots of people dancing, particularly in dimly lit reception halls. Also, remember that flash units take time to recharge, so you are not going to be able to snap one picture after another without waiting until the camera and flash are ready.

Think ahead and plan which images are important to you so that you don’t miss the action while waiting for the flash to recharge. Finally, don’t expect red-eye reduction to work over long distances. It’s great when you’re taking static portraits (just remember to warn your subjects so that they don’t move after the first flash) but it won’t help if you’re zooming in on your subjects from half way across the room.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 4:

Account for Shutter lag. It takes time for a digital camera to capture the image and then record that image on the camera’s memory card. This is very different than traditional film cameras where there is little or no delay from the time you press the shutter until the image is recorded on film.

For action shots, the only solution is to try to anticipate the action by pointing the camera where you think the action will be and pressing the shutter before your subjects actually move into the space. Even with static subjects, such as guests posing with the bride and groom, shutter lag can result in photos where your subjects’ eyes are closed or they have weird expressions on their faces. You, and your subjects, will need to have patience while you take enough pictures to insure that you have captured some good ones. Trial and error will result in your getting some good shots. And, with all that practice, you’ll eventually develop a feel for how long your camera’s time lag is.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 5:

Take advantage of the fact that your wedding photos are digital. You can use digital imaging programs to enhance or correct your photos. For instance, you can crop your photos to remove distracting elements or correct red-eye. Want to save an under-exposed image? Here’s a trick you might try. If the image is too dark and you have artifacts or color shifts in it, consider converting it to a grayscale black-and-white image. It’s an easy fix that will remove the unwanted color from the photo. Then, you can adjust the levels of the image, fixing the exposure. It may not work in every case, but you’ll likely resurrect a few photos you thought were unusable.

The second thing you can do with digital images is share them. Upload your photos to an online wedding gallery site and let the other wedding guests or the bride and groom look at your photos. They’ll even be able to order prints without you having to get involved. Since digital cameras produce images of varying sizes, you’ll want to resize and crop them first before uploading, making them fit standard print sizes of 4×6″ or 8×10″.

Remember to change the resolution so that your images are 300 pixels per inch to insure good prints. It’s also a good idea to make TIFF copies of all your photos before you start working with them since JPEGs degrade each time you save them.

Taking a digital camera to a wedding when you’re a guest can be fun! You don’t have the pressure that the professional Dallas wedding photographer has to get every photograph. By using a digital camera, you can see the pictures immediately, take more photos as needed and fix the ones that you have to. Even better, surprising the bride and groom with additional photos of their special day makes a great and thoughtful gift.

Contact us at 972-822-3587 to schedule your Professional Digital Wedding Photography and Bridal Portraits.

 


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Traditional vs. Photojournalistic Wedding Photography

There are many wedding photographers out there with different levels of professionalism. The word “Journalistic Wedding Photography” is trendy, but what does it mean? It means less formal – catching acts in the moment, spontaneity. Who wouldn’t love that? But it also means a grittier look like a news reporter, less use of flash for a more “raw feeling” to photos. That may or may not put your wedding day in the best light.

At Wedding Photographer Dallas, we offer a blend of both Traditional and Journalistic wedding photography in each of our packages. We are professional digital wedding photographers and we use on-camera flash to fill in shadows, but not dominate the picture or overpower the natural light.

For those of you who may have contacted other wedding photographers and were less than thrilled, we offer some tips for helping you make an educated and perfect decision for yourself.

Do you want a traditional-style photographer or a photojournalistic photographer? You should decide what type of “look” or “feeling” you want in your pictures.

Traditional Wedding Photography
Journalistic Wedding Photography
A traditional photographer will photograph your wedding with a general sense much similar to that of formal portraits.There will be a lot of posed shots with family and bridal party, and even moments such as the first kiss may be re-staged to get the proper image. A journalistic photographer will shoot your wedding with a general sense much similar to that of formal portraits. There will be a lot of posed shots with family and bridal party, and even moments such as the first kiss may be re-staged to get the proper image.
Photojournalistic photographers capture the wedding day with a candid approach, allowing the moments to unfold on their own, similar to the way a sports photographer captures the game as it happens. With this approach, some shots may be blurry to show motion, but virtually nothing is posed or staged with respect to any family portraits desired.

 

The Best Of Both Worlds:
Covenant Photography offers both. Yes there are the portraits and relatives and wedding party photos, but plenty of candids, laughter and dancing! Our Journalistic wedding photography side captures glances, feelings, and the anticipation on through the joy of your grand departure to the honeymoon.

Next, how much money do you want to spend? This question is actually very simple: what are your memories worth? Keep in mind you are paying for a photographer’s time, skill, and creativity — not just your finished product. Photographers’ prices have a wide range depending upon a number of factors, including where you live. Whatever the price may be, never hire a photographer based solely on price.

What type of items do you desire for your finished product(s)? Do you want an album for you and/or your family members? How about online proofing and ordering for out-of-towners who couldn’t make it to the wedding? Maybe you want all of the digital files (negatives) to have your own prints made. Find out what the photographer offers and make sure you are satisfied with what you are paying for.

Covenant Photography offers custom wedding albums, imported from Italy, covered in fine lambskin with the wedding photos collaged to beautifully tell the story of the day. There are preparation photos, ceremony photos, reception fun, and yes, the formal posed shots of family too.

These tips should help you make the right decision for you, in hopes that the rest of your wedding falls into place accordingly. It’s up to the photographer you hire to deliver the memories to you! You have to like their photos and feel comfortable with them as a person you will interact with on your Wedding day.

 


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What to Wear for Your Engagement Portraits

You want to wear something that you both feel comfortable in and can move around in. For pants, that usually means jeans or khakis. For tops, wear something similar, but not identical.

Pure white shirts are too easy to get overexposed in your shots, so I recommend off-whites — beige, sky blue, etc. To look nice but open and free, lots of couples like button down the front shirts that can be tucked in or untucked.

Portrait Setting

Also consider the setting of your engagement photos. Most couples want an outdoor, open park setting, preferably with some water. For Dallas engagement photography, there are some settings, each with a different feel.

Wedding Ceremony Photo Checklist

Our list of Traditional Dallas Wedding Photos our photographers take:
In addition to candid photo and images of spontaneous fun, our wedding photography includes the following common traditional photos.

At the Church prior to the Dallas Wedding Ceremony

  • Mother or Maid of Honor adjusting veil
  • Bride putting on Garter with Bridesmaids looking on
  • Bride in dressing room with mirror
  • Portrait of Mother and Bride
  • Portrait of Father and Bride
  • Bride and Maid of Honor
  • Bride and Bridesmaids
  • Bride pinning corsage on Mother
  • Bride pinning corsage on Father
  • Flower Girl handing bouquet to Bride
  • Brothers and Sisters and Bride
  • Bride’s Mother on Usher’s arm
  • Groom and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Best Man
  • Best Man adjusting Groom’s tie
  • Groom and Father (shaking hands)
  • Groom and Groom’s Parents
  • Groom’s Mother on Usher’s arm
  • Other people being accompanied down the aisle

 

During the Ceremony

  • Bride escorted down the aisle by Father
  • Father giving away the Bride
  • Selected shots during the Ceremony
  • A timed exposure of overall Ceremony

 

After or Before the Ceremony at the Church

  • Bride and Groom coming down the aisle
  • Wedding Party coming down the aisle
  • Groom kissing the Bride at the Altar
  • Exchanging of the Rings
  • Bride and Bridesmaids
  • Bride and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Bridesmaids
  • Bride and Maid of Honor
  • Groom and Best Man
  • Entire Wedding Party
  • Entire Wedding Party with Clergy
  • Bride with Parents
  • Bride with Parents and In-Laws
  • Groom with Parents
  • Groom with Parents and In-Laws
  • Bride and Groom with Parents
  • Bride and Groom with Grandparents

 

At the Reception

  • The receiving Line
  • Wedding Cake (prior to being cut)
  • Guests signing book
  • Introduction of the Wedding Party
  • Wedding Party making Toasts
  • Bride and Groom making Toasts
  • Bride and Father Dance
  • Groom and Mother Dance
  • Candid Dancing shots
  • The bouquet Toss
  • Groom removing Garter
  • Groom throwing Garter
  • Cutting the Cake
  • Feeding the Cake to one another

 


Bridal Portraits

Tying the Knot: The Complete Wedding Organizer

From “Yes to I Do” to “Happily Ever After”, when it comes to tying the knot, the complete wedding organizer answers all your questions. Rest assured, whether you choose Wedding Photographer Dallas’ OrchidLily or Magnolia Wedding Photo packages, your wedding photos will go smoothly and professionally.

With the purchase of wedding photography, you will receive complimentary consultation from My Wedding Organizer to plan your wedding on:

  • Bridal Gown / Wedding Dress 
  • Dallas Wedding Locations
  • Dallas Wedding Portrait Locations
  • Dallas Wedding DJ
  • Dallas Wedding Cake
  • Dallas Wedding Videography / Videographer 
  • Dallas Wedding Ceremony Tips

Our comprehensive guide to wedding planning and services, including caterers, photographer, videographer, and other wedding professionals. Our practical advice will sweep you off your feet from your engagement to when you tie the knot on your wedding day — looking calm, cool and beautiful!

 


Bridal Portraits

Budget Wedding Photo Priorities

Your Wedding Memories: A Matter Of Priorities

For brides and grooms in Dallas who are watching their costs, planning a wedding usually involves making a few tradeoffs in selecting the venue, the number of guests, the food, entertainment and, of course, the photography. But ultimately, the measurement of that special day is not tied to the luxury of the setting or headstones of the cake, but to the precious memories that are created and preserved.

For many of these Dallas couples, skillful wedding photojournalism is a way to assure that the touching and profound photos from their wedding are captured — regardless of where the event is held, or how much money is spent on accoutrements. This is a critical consideration for anyone planning a wedding on a budget.

Every bride has her unique priorities. Some brides dream their whole life about a wedding dress, so they will put a high priority on that. For others it’s photography, because that’s what lasts. It ’s your own personal wedding memories, but great wedding photography is also about sharing with others — into future generations.
When all is said and done, many of those costly trappings of the day — food, flowers, decorations are going to be gone the moment the date has passed. Certainly, you want to enjoy the experience and have a nice party for people, but the photos are going to be there forever.

No matter how nice the environment or flowers are, favorable photography conditions always trump sheer luxury or scenic drama when it comes to capturing those memories. Dive photographed weddings where the lighting was bad, the crowd was thick, and the time was too short, so those factors are just as important as the environment or scenery itself. But when I share the wedding photos, none of that is remembered — just the moment I capture as a photographer.

THE SKILL OF CAPTURING MEMORIES

Make sure that whatever money you do allocate to photography is money well spent. The most experienced wedding photographer is a true expert at preserving those special moments — even when the setting or venue may not be anything close to ideal.

We make your wedding photos into an ideal photojournalistic event full of all the beauty, love, spontaneity, emotion and action. We were recently challenged by a wedding in a windery painted in muted, dark tones, with little natural light, followed by a reception at a rather dark meeting hall. Although the conditions were budget, the result, thankfully, were prints described as “incredibly beautiful.”

Our brides are definitely getting value, regardless of whether they choose our OrchidLily or Magnolia wedding photography package.

FOCUSING ON THE ESSENCE

Your wedding location is a background element used only to frame and accentuate the bride and groom. The simpler it is, the better I can focus the attention on my human subjects and the touching moments happening.

FOLLOWING THROUGH ON PRIORITIES

When juggling wedding costs, It is all about considering what is really important and staying true to your priorities. Don’t trust your irreplaceable memories to just anyone. And those priorities are ultimately about the value of memories.

In surveys, of newlyweds on their 1-year anniversary, when asked what was the #1 thing they would have changed, at the top of the list is “I would have spent more on my wedding photography.”

When the flowers are gone, the cake is eaten, the dress is in storage – your wedding photos and memories will last forever.

 


Bridal Portraits

7 Tips For Better Wedding Photos

Professional wedding photography requires some serious training. Here are some free tips so you can take better wedding photos.
 
In this article we don’t intend to turn you into a professional Dallas wedding photographer. Rather, we assume you may be a guest at some wedding soon, you want to bring your camera along, and you hope to capture a few great photos of the Bride and Groom and your friends and family.
 
Wedding Photography Tip One:
 
Stay out of the way of the professional photographer. 
 
Chances are, the couple that is getting married has spent money to hire a reputable professional. The wedding photographer has a big job to do – and a big responsibility to do it right and get all the important shots – all in a limited time. So you don’t want to get in the professional’s way and hamper his or her activities.
 

For example, if the photographer is taking posed portraits of the bride, the groom, or their family members, don’t try to also take a photo of each pose the photographer sets up. He or she is doing a job. You and your camera will certainly be in the way, even if you try to be unobtrusive. What’s more, the pro wants to sell a print of each pose to the couple. Chances are, with the equipment that he or she is using, the results will be great, and the couple will still buy a photo from the pro even though you take the same shot. But, if you offer the same shot free to the couple – based on the pose and lighting the pro set up – the wedding photographer may lose a sale. This isn’t fair. It’s his pose. It’s his lighting. It should be his print!

In addition, if you’re taking pictures off to one side of the pro, you’ll distract some members of the wedding party and slow down the whole process.

So don’t interfere with the wedding photographer’s posed pictures. Don’t worry, you’ll have lots and lots of other opportunities!

Wedding Photography Tip Two:

If you want to take pictures in the church, sit in an aisle seat. Chances are you won’t take many pictures before the ceremony – after all, you’re a guest (or perhaps a member of the wedding party). So you’ll be plenty busy before the ceremony socializing, and then taking your seat and waiting for the ceremony to get underway. Let’s assume, however, that you have your camera with you and you want to take some pictures during the ceremony.

But don’t start firing away until you know what’s permitted and what’s not permitted in that particular house of worship. Understand, some ministers, priests, and rabbis don’t care a hoot about cameras and flashes. They expect the pro and the guests to blaze away during the ceremony. However, others permit pictures, but not flash.

How to know? Our advice is to watch the professional wedding photographer. We will know the Rules of the Wedding Facility. If we are moving freely about the church and using a flash on camera, then chances are you can take some flash-pictures too. If he takes pictures, but doesn’t use flash, you can probably do the same. If other guests start to take pictures as the bride goes down the aisle, and the minister doesn’t say something at the start of the ceremony, then you may as well join in.

Assuming it’s OK to take pictures, then, our tip is that you seat yourself along the center aisle.

Wedding Photography Tip Three:

Actually, this “Tip” offers two wedding photo tips concerning the important shots to get “at the church.”

  1. Should you try to photograph during the wedding ceremony’s cherished moments like the “I do’s,” the slipping on of the wedding ring, the first kiss, the blessing, or (at Jewish weddings) the breaking of the glass? This really depends upon how close you are to the action. A good picture should pretty much fill the frame with the action. If you’re seated way back and you’re not using a telephoto lens, the likelihood is that the bride and groom will be mere specks in your picture. If so, our advice is to either forego taking any shots during the ceremony (no law says you can’t just sit back and enjoy the moment) or take a shot or two “for memory’s sake.” If, on the other hand, it’s a small wedding and you can get close to the action and fill the frame, by all means take the shots!
  2. While you can photograph them coming down the aisle before the ceremony, your best shots will be when they come back up the aisle after the ceremony. Here’s why. First, the bride and the groom traditionally come down the aisle separately before the ceremony. While there’s nothing wrong with getting pictures of them individually as they enter, remember that you will have the back of the church as your background. Second, don’t bother to take pictures after they pass you. You want to capture the expressions on their faces, not the back of their heads.

But you definitely want to capture them coming up the aisle after the ceremony. You’ll get their happy expressions. You’ll have the altar as your background. And the Happy Couple will undoubtedly look less nervous and more radiant.

Wedding Photography Tip Four:

Many of the best pictures taken at weddings are portraits. In today’s fast-paced society, there are only a few events that cause families to gather together – mainly, weddings. Our weddings are joyous occasions, and offer you lots of opportunities to take pictures of family and friends.

People make the wedding and the party that follows. And when it comes to “people pictures” you’ve got great opportunities. We said earlier that you’ll be able to take great photos at the event that the pro won’t. Among these opportunities are portraits of friends and family. After all, you know them, you know who’s near-and-dear to you – and the pro doesn’t. So here’s your chance to shine. They’re all dressed up and having a good time, and you have nearly unlimited photo opportunities.

Most of these opportunities occur at the reception after the wedding. When you want to shoot a person or a small group, give them a moment to get composed.

If you’re photographing a group at a table (more on this in a moment), wait till they finish chewing, take the glasses and cutlery out of their hands, watch out for clutter in the foreground, and use your flash.

Whenever you photograph two or more people together, try to show a relationship between them. Get them close together. If you’re taking a picture of a parent and child, have one put an arm around the other. Have family members show affection for each other.

Whenever you take a portrait of a person or group, get up close and fill the frame with your subjects.

Wedding Photography Tip Five:

Set up “table shots” the way the pros do. Professional “table shots” – the shots of each table of guests seated at the reception meal – are rarely purchased by the Happy Couple.

Here’s another opportunity for you and your camera. Chances are you know some or all of the people with whom you’re seated. So why not take a picture of them? Here’s how to handle it like a pro: Ask about half of the guests seated at the table to leave their seats and stand behind the other half of the guests. In other words, clear one side of the table and have the people from that side stand behind the people on other side, who remain seated. If you’ve got some elderly guests at the table, let them stay seated and move the younger ones in behind them.

By moving half the people out of their seats, you’ll be able to fill your horizontal frame with two rows of people. But be careful here. Avoid showing the entire table in the foreground – it’s probably a mess! Instead, concentrate on filling the frame of your photo with people, and eliminate the clutter on the table by not showing the tablecloth, dirty dishes, smudged napkins, etc.

Wedding Photography Tip Six.

It has become common place to put a cardboard disposable camera, usually the type that includes a built-in flash unit, on each table at the reception with the idea that the guests at that table will use it at their table, and the bride and groom will develop the film and have the spontaneous photos that are created to enjoy and possibly augment their wedding album.

The problem is that at many weddings no one gets the ball rolling. Or the guest who does take up the camera doesn’t know how to take good pictures with it. Since you know what to do, we suggest you take command. Show the other people at your table who express any interest how to charge the flash, how to advance the film, take a few pictures yourself, and then pass the camera to someone else.

Encourage the other users to get close and fill the frame with the subject. Warn them, however, that the cardboard cameras probably can’t focus closer than four feet and that the flash is only good out to about twelve feet. So alert them to stay in that range when they use the camera. You’ll be doing the bride and groom a real service and they’ll be grateful, even if they never know the effort you made.

Wedding Photography Tip Seven:

While you may want to capture those “scripted” moments like the wedding toasts, the cake cutting, and the bouquet-tossing, you may be better off turning away from the action and capturing “reaction” shots of the faces of guests.

A wedding reception is a party. There’s lots of food and music and dancing. But most of the action is hard to photograph, so we have suggested you concentrate on portraits. What about those “scripted” moments like the Best Man’s toast, or the cake cutting, or the bride’s bouquet toss?

At these moments, you have two choices: You can, if you like, try to capture them with your camera. But your pictures are likely to be duplicates of what the pro captures. A better idea might be to concentrate on the faces of family members and friends during these important moments. Aim to capture “reaction shots,” that is, candid portrait photos of people feeling strong emotion as they watch their loved ones at this important moment. Here’s a perfect opportunity for you to capture some great shots!

If you follow these seven Tips, you’ll get great results at the weddings you attend. If you’re planning on using a digital camera, don’t miss our article on Using a Digital Camera at a Wedding. So bring along your camera…and enjoy.

Contact us at 972-822-3587 to schedule your Dallas wedding photography.


Bridal Portraits

What To Look For in Your Wedding Photographer

Photography Style - Do you like the photographer’s photography style? When you see a portfolio of previous work he/she has done, can you picture yourself in that specific photographic style?

Would you like yourself photographed in the same way? Is there enough variety in the photographer’s style to give you the photographs you want? Call us and we will meet with you and show portfolios and answer all your questions!

Experience - Make sure the photographer has had experience professionally photographing other weddings. Does he/she do this for a living or as a hobby?

Your wedding day photos come once in a lifetime and are too important to trust in the hands of a friend hobbyist. We have 10 years experience photographing weddings in all kinds of settings and lighting conditions, so we know how to bring out the best in your wedding photos.

Personality - Make sure that the comfort level is there between you and the photographer. You want to make sure that the photographer’s personality is there to compliment your special day. Maybe even give you encouragement to strike a pose or feel more free and enjoyable!

 


Bridal Portraits

Dallas Destination Wedding Photography

Dallas Texas is a favorite destination wedding spot — not only known for its selection of many wedding venues, but also for its large, welcoming heart. Dallas Texas destination brides and groom can choose from a wonderful selection of wedding locations to make your celebration spectacular, captured in quality by your wedding photographer – numerous hotels, beautiful churches and gorgeous halls that span a variety of tastes and pricings.

The greater Dallas region is a wedding destination that couples will love. Entertainment and sports venues are in plenty in this city. Dallas has lots of varied architecture, giving you unique wedding photography location ideas for your wedding photographer to shoot your unforgettable wedding pictures. With a Dallas destination wedding, you have the option of hosting your wedding in the beautiful city life or in the lush countryside.

Everything in Dallas says “big”, from its land to its heart, which means that no matter how you decide to celebrate your wedding, you will certainly have many big moments captured in picture by your professional wedding photographer.

 


Bridal Portraits

Today’s Wedding Photography Trends

Leafing through glossy magazines in 1940s and ’50s, engaged couples began to see something new — candid, intimate photographs of celebrity and royal weddings taken by photojournalists. Sure, there were formal poses, but many photos captured the moment, for better or worse. :)

Dallas Wedding Photographer

In 1956 magazines worldwide gave the royal treatment to the grand wedding of actress Grace Kelly to Prince Rainier of Monaco, devoting full-page spreads to candid moments, such as a pensive Princess Grace gazing over a balcony before the ceremony and the couple exchanging rings.

Invite photojournalists to your wedding and they’ll do what they do best — record the moment with candid, humorous, touching photos. Artful images of unfettered moments have universal appeal, and these early photographs helped spark a new genre of Dallas wedding photography. Decades later this documentary approach has evolved to what it is now: a popular option in wedding photography that captures the story behind the ceremony. Today it’s available to everyone, not just celebrities, and our photojournalistic wedding photography shows it best.

Mark Kaiser, a Dallas, Texas wedding photographer, has earned a degree in fine art, but primarily photographs weddings and bridal portraits. He got into wedding photography when he took his photography hobby to some friends weddings and the feedback was always the same – “these wedding photos are better than from our professional photographer.”

Today, my years of experience help me know when a “perfect moment” is around the corner. I am poised with my camera, ready to capture that instant.

trends-02Capturing real moments on one of the most transforming days in people’s lives is what wedding photography is about for Covenant Photography of Dallas. Mark’s fine art training taught him to create images that transcend the ordinary to become amazing, so that anyone looking at his powerful wedding pictures will be moved.

Whereas traditional wedding photography follows a common script for wedding photos, a mixture of photojournalistic style takes advantage of unscripted moments in order to best tell the story.

Today, we credit brides and grooms for furthering the development of wedding photojournalism photography. “Weddings are exciting to shoot today because people are so visual now,” he says, and that carries over to location, fashion, and details, like flowers. “People want art photos. They want something better than their parent’s wedding pictures.”

Wedding Photographer Dallas allows the view to “go behind the scenes” as it were and be a true participant in the adventure and joy of covenant love called “Dallas Wedding.”

Call us at 972-822-3587 to reserve your special day.

 


Bridal Portraits

Using a Digital Camera at Weddings

At the wedding, the “fun factor” of digital includes instant results and the opportunity to share moments from an event while the event is still ongoing. So, without further ado, here are our Tips for Great Digital Wedding Photos.

Just like we mentioned in our companion piece, 7 Tips for Best Wedding Pictures, this article is designed to help you, the wedding guest, capture great photos with your digital point-and-shoot camera. Our goal is not to turn you into a professional Dallas wedding photographer. Rather, we’ll help you understand the issues you’ll face when you try to take digital photos at any of the affairs you’re likely to attend as a guest this wedding season.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 1:

Take plenty of camera batteries and memory cards. Due to issues with wedding flash recycling time and shutter lag that are inherent in digital cameras, you’re likely to be taking many more photos at the reception than you may think, since many of them may not come out, some one may move or blink, etc… . Consequently, you’ll be draining your camera’s batteries by not only taking the photos, but by reviewing them during the reception.

Which brings us to the second part of this tip: bringing as much memory with you as possible. The more memory cards you have with you, the less likely you’ll be to miss the party as you sit in your chair trying to find space on your card for one more picture. You know… that all important one of your best friend getting hit in the head with the bridal bouquet. The one picture you can’t possibly miss! So, plan ahead and bring more than you think you’ll need in both memory cards and batteries.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 2:

Take advantage of your camera’s ability to change ISO. Many point-and-shoot cameras are set automatically so that they expose much like a traditional camera loaded with 100 ISO film. This is great for outdoor photos, but may be woefully inadequate inside a reception hall or church even with the flash turned on. However, unlike traditional film-based point-and-shoots, many digital cameras are more sophisticated and allow the photographer to set higher ISO ratings. If you find that the backgrounds of your photos are coming out dark, even with the flash on, try boosting the ISO setting on your digital camera to 200 or 400. While you may pay for this increase in gain with some graininess, color shifts, and artifacts, you’ll find that the backgrounds will be much lighter and the on-camera flash will appear to work much better.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 3:

Don’t expect too much from your flash. Any less-than-professional on-camera flash tends to be woefully inadequate, but it’s still better than nothing. Just remember that the flash is not likely to cover a lot of distance, leaving much of the background in your photos dark. To compensate, try adjusting the camera’s ISO setting, and remember to place your subjects up close to fill as much of the frame as possible. Don’t expect to get great group shots of people dancing, particularly in dimly lit reception halls. Also, remember that flash units take time to recharge, so you are not going to be able to snap one picture after another without waiting until the camera and flash are ready.

Think ahead and plan which images are important to you so that you don’t miss the action while waiting for the flash to recharge. Finally, don’t expect red-eye reduction to work over long distances. It’s great when you’re taking static portraits (just remember to warn your subjects so that they don’t move after the first flash) but it won’t help if you’re zooming in on your subjects from half way across the room.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 4:

Account for Shutter lag. It takes time for a digital camera to capture the image and then record that image on the camera’s memory card. This is very different than traditional film cameras where there is little or no delay from the time you press the shutter until the image is recorded on film.

For action shots, the only solution is to try to anticipate the action by pointing the camera where you think the action will be and pressing the shutter before your subjects actually move into the space. Even with static subjects, such as guests posing with the bride and groom, shutter lag can result in photos where your subjects’ eyes are closed or they have weird expressions on their faces. You, and your subjects, will need to have patience while you take enough pictures to insure that you have captured some good ones. Trial and error will result in your getting some good shots. And, with all that practice, you’ll eventually develop a feel for how long your camera’s time lag is.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 5:

Take advantage of the fact that your wedding photos are digital. You can use digital imaging programs to enhance or correct your photos. For instance, you can crop your photos to remove distracting elements or correct red-eye. Want to save an under-exposed image? Here’s a trick you might try. If the image is too dark and you have artifacts or color shifts in it, consider converting it to a grayscale black-and-white image. It’s an easy fix that will remove the unwanted color from the photo. Then, you can adjust the levels of the image, fixing the exposure. It may not work in every case, but you’ll likely resurrect a few photos you thought were unusable.

The second thing you can do with digital images is share them. Upload your photos to an online wedding gallery site and let the other wedding guests or the bride and groom look at your photos. They’ll even be able to order prints without you having to get involved. Since digital cameras produce images of varying sizes, you’ll want to resize and crop them first before uploading, making them fit standard print sizes of 4×6″ or 8×10″.

Remember to change the resolution so that your images are 300 pixels per inch to insure good prints. It’s also a good idea to make TIFF copies of all your photos before you start working with them since JPEGs degrade each time you save them.

Taking a digital camera to a wedding when you’re a guest can be fun! You don’t have the pressure that the professional Dallas wedding photographer has to get every photograph. By using a digital camera, you can see the pictures immediately, take more photos as needed and fix the ones that you have to. Even better, surprising the bride and groom with additional photos of their special day makes a great and thoughtful gift.

Contact us at 972-822-3587 to schedule your Professional Digital Wedding Photography and Bridal Portraits.

 


Bridal Portraits

Traditional vs. Photojournalistic Wedding Photography

There are many wedding photographers out there with different levels of professionalism. The word “Journalistic Wedding Photography” is trendy, but what does it mean? It means less formal – catching acts in the moment, spontaneity. Who wouldn’t love that? But it also means a grittier look like a news reporter, less use of flash for a more “raw feeling” to photos. That may or may not put your wedding day in the best light.

At Wedding Photographer Dallas, we offer a blend of both Traditional and Journalistic wedding photography in each of our packages. We are professional digital wedding photographers and we use on-camera flash to fill in shadows, but not dominate the picture or overpower the natural light.

For those of you who may have contacted other wedding photographers and were less than thrilled, we offer some tips for helping you make an educated and perfect decision for yourself.

Do you want a traditional-style photographer or a photojournalistic photographer? You should decide what type of “look” or “feeling” you want in your pictures.

Traditional Wedding Photography
Journalistic Wedding Photography
A traditional photographer will photograph your wedding with a general sense much similar to that of formal portraits.There will be a lot of posed shots with family and bridal party, and even moments such as the first kiss may be re-staged to get the proper image. A journalistic photographer will shoot your wedding with a general sense much similar to that of formal portraits. There will be a lot of posed shots with family and bridal party, and even moments such as the first kiss may be re-staged to get the proper image.
Photojournalistic photographers capture the wedding day with a candid approach, allowing the moments to unfold on their own, similar to the way a sports photographer captures the game as it happens. With this approach, some shots may be blurry to show motion, but virtually nothing is posed or staged with respect to any family portraits desired.

 

The Best Of Both Worlds:
Covenant Photography offers both. Yes there are the portraits and relatives and wedding party photos, but plenty of candids, laughter and dancing! Our Journalistic wedding photography side captures glances, feelings, and the anticipation on through the joy of your grand departure to the honeymoon.

Next, how much money do you want to spend? This question is actually very simple: what are your memories worth? Keep in mind you are paying for a photographer’s time, skill, and creativity — not just your finished product. Photographers’ prices have a wide range depending upon a number of factors, including where you live. Whatever the price may be, never hire a photographer based solely on price.

What type of items do you desire for your finished product(s)? Do you want an album for you and/or your family members? How about online proofing and ordering for out-of-towners who couldn’t make it to the wedding? Maybe you want all of the digital files (negatives) to have your own prints made. Find out what the photographer offers and make sure you are satisfied with what you are paying for.

Covenant Photography offers custom wedding albums, imported from Italy, covered in fine lambskin with the wedding photos collaged to beautifully tell the story of the day. There are preparation photos, ceremony photos, reception fun, and yes, the formal posed shots of family too.

These tips should help you make the right decision for you, in hopes that the rest of your wedding falls into place accordingly. It’s up to the photographer you hire to deliver the memories to you! You have to like their photos and feel comfortable with them as a person you will interact with on your Wedding day.

 


Bridal Portraits

What to Wear for Your Engagement Portraits

You want to wear something that you both feel comfortable in and can move around in. For pants, that usually means jeans or khakis. For tops, wear something similar, but not identical.

Pure white shirts are too easy to get overexposed in your shots, so I recommend off-whites — beige, sky blue, etc. To look nice but open and free, lots of couples like button down the front shirts that can be tucked in or untucked.

Portrait Setting

Also consider the setting of your engagement photos. Most couples want an outdoor, open park setting, preferably with some water. For Dallas engagement photography, there are some settings, each with a different feel.

Wedding Ceremony Photo Checklist

Our list of Traditional Dallas Wedding Photos our photographers take:
In addition to candid photo and images of spontaneous fun, our wedding photography includes the following common traditional photos.

At the Church prior to the Dallas Wedding Ceremony

  • Mother or Maid of Honor adjusting veil
  • Bride putting on Garter with Bridesmaids looking on
  • Bride in dressing room with mirror
  • Portrait of Mother and Bride
  • Portrait of Father and Bride
  • Bride and Maid of Honor
  • Bride and Bridesmaids
  • Bride pinning corsage on Mother
  • Bride pinning corsage on Father
  • Flower Girl handing bouquet to Bride
  • Brothers and Sisters and Bride
  • Bride’s Mother on Usher’s arm
  • Groom and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Best Man
  • Best Man adjusting Groom’s tie
  • Groom and Father (shaking hands)
  • Groom and Groom’s Parents
  • Groom’s Mother on Usher’s arm
  • Other people being accompanied down the aisle

 

During the Ceremony

  • Bride escorted down the aisle by Father
  • Father giving away the Bride
  • Selected shots during the Ceremony
  • A timed exposure of overall Ceremony

 

After or Before the Ceremony at the Church

  • Bride and Groom coming down the aisle
  • Wedding Party coming down the aisle
  • Groom kissing the Bride at the Altar
  • Exchanging of the Rings
  • Bride and Bridesmaids
  • Bride and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Groomsmen
  • Groom and Bridesmaids
  • Bride and Maid of Honor
  • Groom and Best Man
  • Entire Wedding Party
  • Entire Wedding Party with Clergy
  • Bride with Parents
  • Bride with Parents and In-Laws
  • Groom with Parents
  • Groom with Parents and In-Laws
  • Bride and Groom with Parents
  • Bride and Groom with Grandparents

 

At the Reception

  • The receiving Line
  • Wedding Cake (prior to being cut)
  • Guests signing book
  • Introduction of the Wedding Party
  • Wedding Party making Toasts
  • Bride and Groom making Toasts
  • Bride and Father Dance
  • Groom and Mother Dance
  • Candid Dancing shots
  • The bouquet Toss
  • Groom removing Garter
  • Groom throwing Garter
  • Cutting the Cake
  • Feeding the Cake to one another

 


Wedding Video

Tying the Knot: The Complete Wedding Organizer

From “Yes to I Do” to “Happily Ever After”, when it comes to tying the knot, the complete wedding organizer answers all your questions. Rest assured, whether you choose Wedding Photographer Dallas’ OrchidLily or Magnolia Wedding Photo packages, your wedding photos will go smoothly and professionally.

With the purchase of wedding photography, you will receive complimentary consultation from My Wedding Organizer to plan your wedding on:

  • Bridal Gown / Wedding Dress 
  • Dallas Wedding Locations
  • Dallas Wedding Portrait Locations
  • Dallas Wedding DJ
  • Dallas Wedding Cake
  • Dallas Wedding Videography / Videographer 
  • Dallas Wedding Ceremony Tips

Our comprehensive guide to wedding planning and services, including caterers, photographer, videographer, and other wedding professionals. Our practical advice will sweep you off your feet from your engagement to when you tie the knot on your wedding day — looking calm, cool and beautiful!

 


Wedding Video

Budget Wedding Photo Priorities

Your Wedding Memories: A Matter Of Priorities

For brides and grooms in Dallas who are watching their costs, planning a wedding usually involves making a few tradeoffs in selecting the venue, the number of guests, the food, entertainment and, of course, the photography. But ultimately, the measurement of that special day is not tied to the luxury of the setting or headstones of the cake, but to the precious memories that are created and preserved.

For many of these Dallas couples, skillful wedding photojournalism is a way to assure that the touching and profound photos from their wedding are captured — regardless of where the event is held, or how much money is spent on accoutrements. This is a critical consideration for anyone planning a wedding on a budget.

Every bride has her unique priorities. Some brides dream their whole life about a wedding dress, so they will put a high priority on that. For others it’s photography, because that’s what lasts. It ’s your own personal wedding memories, but great wedding photography is also about sharing with others — into future generations.
When all is said and done, many of those costly trappings of the day — food, flowers, decorations are going to be gone the moment the date has passed. Certainly, you want to enjoy the experience and have a nice party for people, but the photos are going to be there forever.

No matter how nice the environment or flowers are, favorable photography conditions always trump sheer luxury or scenic drama when it comes to capturing those memories. Dive photographed weddings where the lighting was bad, the crowd was thick, and the time was too short, so those factors are just as important as the environment or scenery itself. But when I share the wedding photos, none of that is remembered — just the moment I capture as a photographer.

THE SKILL OF CAPTURING MEMORIES

Make sure that whatever money you do allocate to photography is money well spent. The most experienced wedding photographer is a true expert at preserving those special moments — even when the setting or venue may not be anything close to ideal.

We make your wedding photos into an ideal photojournalistic event full of all the beauty, love, spontaneity, emotion and action. We were recently challenged by a wedding in a windery painted in muted, dark tones, with little natural light, followed by a reception at a rather dark meeting hall. Although the conditions were budget, the result, thankfully, were prints described as “incredibly beautiful.”

Our brides are definitely getting value, regardless of whether they choose our OrchidLily or Magnolia wedding photography package.

FOCUSING ON THE ESSENCE

Your wedding location is a background element used only to frame and accentuate the bride and groom. The simpler it is, the better I can focus the attention on my human subjects and the touching moments happening.

FOLLOWING THROUGH ON PRIORITIES

When juggling wedding costs, It is all about considering what is really important and staying true to your priorities. Don’t trust your irreplaceable memories to just anyone. And those priorities are ultimately about the value of memories.

In surveys, of newlyweds on their 1-year anniversary, when asked what was the #1 thing they would have changed, at the top of the list is “I would have spent more on my wedding photography.”

When the flowers are gone, the cake is eaten, the dress is in storage – your wedding photos and memories will last forever.

 


Wedding Video

7 Tips For Better Wedding Photos

Professional wedding photography requires some serious training. Here are some free tips so you can take better wedding photos.
 
In this article we don’t intend to turn you into a professional Dallas wedding photographer. Rather, we assume you may be a guest at some wedding soon, you want to bring your camera along, and you hope to capture a few great photos of the Bride and Groom and your friends and family.
 
Wedding Photography Tip One:
 
Stay out of the way of the professional photographer. 
 
Chances are, the couple that is getting married has spent money to hire a reputable professional. The wedding photographer has a big job to do – and a big responsibility to do it right and get all the important shots – all in a limited time. So you don’t want to get in the professional’s way and hamper his or her activities.
 

For example, if the photographer is taking posed portraits of the bride, the groom, or their family members, don’t try to also take a photo of each pose the photographer sets up. He or she is doing a job. You and your camera will certainly be in the way, even if you try to be unobtrusive. What’s more, the pro wants to sell a print of each pose to the couple. Chances are, with the equipment that he or she is using, the results will be great, and the couple will still buy a photo from the pro even though you take the same shot. But, if you offer the same shot free to the couple – based on the pose and lighting the pro set up – the wedding photographer may lose a sale. This isn’t fair. It’s his pose. It’s his lighting. It should be his print!

In addition, if you’re taking pictures off to one side of the pro, you’ll distract some members of the wedding party and slow down the whole process.

So don’t interfere with the wedding photographer’s posed pictures. Don’t worry, you’ll have lots and lots of other opportunities!

Wedding Photography Tip Two:

If you want to take pictures in the church, sit in an aisle seat. Chances are you won’t take many pictures before the ceremony – after all, you’re a guest (or perhaps a member of the wedding party). So you’ll be plenty busy before the ceremony socializing, and then taking your seat and waiting for the ceremony to get underway. Let’s assume, however, that you have your camera with you and you want to take some pictures during the ceremony.

But don’t start firing away until you know what’s permitted and what’s not permitted in that particular house of worship. Understand, some ministers, priests, and rabbis don’t care a hoot about cameras and flashes. They expect the pro and the guests to blaze away during the ceremony. However, others permit pictures, but not flash.

How to know? Our advice is to watch the professional wedding photographer. We will know the Rules of the Wedding Facility. If we are moving freely about the church and using a flash on camera, then chances are you can take some flash-pictures too. If he takes pictures, but doesn’t use flash, you can probably do the same. If other guests start to take pictures as the bride goes down the aisle, and the minister doesn’t say something at the start of the ceremony, then you may as well join in.

Assuming it’s OK to take pictures, then, our tip is that you seat yourself along the center aisle.

Wedding Photography Tip Three:

Actually, this “Tip” offers two wedding photo tips concerning the important shots to get “at the church.”

  1. Should you try to photograph during the wedding ceremony’s cherished moments like the “I do’s,” the slipping on of the wedding ring, the first kiss, the blessing, or (at Jewish weddings) the breaking of the glass? This really depends upon how close you are to the action. A good picture should pretty much fill the frame with the action. If you’re seated way back and you’re not using a telephoto lens, the likelihood is that the bride and groom will be mere specks in your picture. If so, our advice is to either forego taking any shots during the ceremony (no law says you can’t just sit back and enjoy the moment) or take a shot or two “for memory’s sake.” If, on the other hand, it’s a small wedding and you can get close to the action and fill the frame, by all means take the shots!
  2. While you can photograph them coming down the aisle before the ceremony, your best shots will be when they come back up the aisle after the ceremony. Here’s why. First, the bride and the groom traditionally come down the aisle separately before the ceremony. While there’s nothing wrong with getting pictures of them individually as they enter, remember that you will have the back of the church as your background. Second, don’t bother to take pictures after they pass you. You want to capture the expressions on their faces, not the back of their heads.

But you definitely want to capture them coming up the aisle after the ceremony. You’ll get their happy expressions. You’ll have the altar as your background. And the Happy Couple will undoubtedly look less nervous and more radiant.

Wedding Photography Tip Four:

Many of the best pictures taken at weddings are portraits. In today’s fast-paced society, there are only a few events that cause families to gather together – mainly, weddings. Our weddings are joyous occasions, and offer you lots of opportunities to take pictures of family and friends.

People make the wedding and the party that follows. And when it comes to “people pictures” you’ve got great opportunities. We said earlier that you’ll be able to take great photos at the event that the pro won’t. Among these opportunities are portraits of friends and family. After all, you know them, you know who’s near-and-dear to you – and the pro doesn’t. So here’s your chance to shine. They’re all dressed up and having a good time, and you have nearly unlimited photo opportunities.

Most of these opportunities occur at the reception after the wedding. When you want to shoot a person or a small group, give them a moment to get composed.

If you’re photographing a group at a table (more on this in a moment), wait till they finish chewing, take the glasses and cutlery out of their hands, watch out for clutter in the foreground, and use your flash.

Whenever you photograph two or more people together, try to show a relationship between them. Get them close together. If you’re taking a picture of a parent and child, have one put an arm around the other. Have family members show affection for each other.

Whenever you take a portrait of a person or group, get up close and fill the frame with your subjects.

Wedding Photography Tip Five:

Set up “table shots” the way the pros do. Professional “table shots” – the shots of each table of guests seated at the reception meal – are rarely purchased by the Happy Couple.

Here’s another opportunity for you and your camera. Chances are you know some or all of the people with whom you’re seated. So why not take a picture of them? Here’s how to handle it like a pro: Ask about half of the guests seated at the table to leave their seats and stand behind the other half of the guests. In other words, clear one side of the table and have the people from that side stand behind the people on other side, who remain seated. If you’ve got some elderly guests at the table, let them stay seated and move the younger ones in behind them.

By moving half the people out of their seats, you’ll be able to fill your horizontal frame with two rows of people. But be careful here. Avoid showing the entire table in the foreground – it’s probably a mess! Instead, concentrate on filling the frame of your photo with people, and eliminate the clutter on the table by not showing the tablecloth, dirty dishes, smudged napkins, etc.

Wedding Photography Tip Six.

It has become common place to put a cardboard disposable camera, usually the type that includes a built-in flash unit, on each table at the reception with the idea that the guests at that table will use it at their table, and the bride and groom will develop the film and have the spontaneous photos that are created to enjoy and possibly augment their wedding album.

The problem is that at many weddings no one gets the ball rolling. Or the guest who does take up the camera doesn’t know how to take good pictures with it. Since you know what to do, we suggest you take command. Show the other people at your table who express any interest how to charge the flash, how to advance the film, take a few pictures yourself, and then pass the camera to someone else.

Encourage the other users to get close and fill the frame with the subject. Warn them, however, that the cardboard cameras probably can’t focus closer than four feet and that the flash is only good out to about twelve feet. So alert them to stay in that range when they use the camera. You’ll be doing the bride and groom a real service and they’ll be grateful, even if they never know the effort you made.

Wedding Photography Tip Seven:

While you may want to capture those “scripted” moments like the wedding toasts, the cake cutting, and the bouquet-tossing, you may be better off turning away from the action and capturing “reaction” shots of the faces of guests.

A wedding reception is a party. There’s lots of food and music and dancing. But most of the action is hard to photograph, so we have suggested you concentrate on portraits. What about those “scripted” moments like the Best Man’s toast, or the cake cutting, or the bride’s bouquet toss?

At these moments, you have two choices: You can, if you like, try to capture them with your camera. But your pictures are likely to be duplicates of what the pro captures. A better idea might be to concentrate on the faces of family members and friends during these important moments. Aim to capture “reaction shots,” that is, candid portrait photos of people feeling strong emotion as they watch their loved ones at this important moment. Here’s a perfect opportunity for you to capture some great shots!

If you follow these seven Tips, you’ll get great results at the weddings you attend. If you’re planning on using a digital camera, don’t miss our article on Using a Digital Camera at a Wedding. So bring along your camera…and enjoy.

Contact us at 972-822-3587 to schedule your Dallas wedding photography.


Wedding Video

What To Look For in Your Wedding Photographer

Photography Style - Do you like the photographer’s photography style? When you see a portfolio of previous work he/she has done, can you picture yourself in that specific photographic style?

Would you like yourself photographed in the same way? Is there enough variety in the photographer’s style to give you the photographs you want? Call us and we will meet with you and show portfolios and answer all your questions!

Experience - Make sure the photographer has had experience professionally photographing other weddings. Does he/she do this for a living or as a hobby?

Your wedding day photos come once in a lifetime and are too important to trust in the hands of a friend hobbyist. We have 10 years experience photographing weddings in all kinds of settings and lighting conditions, so we know how to bring out the best in your wedding photos.

Personality - Make sure that the comfort level is there between you and the photographer. You want to make sure that the photographer’s personality is there to compliment your special day. Maybe even give you encouragement to strike a pose or feel more free and enjoyable!

 


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Dallas Destination Wedding Photography

Dallas Texas is a favorite destination wedding spot — not only known for its selection of many wedding venues, but also for its large, welcoming heart. Dallas Texas destination brides and groom can choose from a wonderful selection of wedding locations to make your celebration spectacular, captured in quality by your wedding photographer – numerous hotels, beautiful churches and gorgeous halls that span a variety of tastes and pricings.

The greater Dallas region is a wedding destination that couples will love. Entertainment and sports venues are in plenty in this city. Dallas has lots of varied architecture, giving you unique wedding photography location ideas for your wedding photographer to shoot your unforgettable wedding pictures. With a Dallas destination wedding, you have the option of hosting your wedding in the beautiful city life or in the lush countryside.

Everything in Dallas says “big”, from its land to its heart, which means that no matter how you decide to celebrate your wedding, you will certainly have many big moments captured in picture by your professional wedding photographer.

 


Wedding Video

Today’s Wedding Photography Trends

Leafing through glossy magazines in 1940s and ’50s, engaged couples began to see something new — candid, intimate photographs of celebrity and royal weddings taken by photojournalists. Sure, there were formal poses, but many photos captured the moment, for better or worse. :)

Dallas Wedding Photographer

In 1956 magazines worldwide gave the royal treatment to the grand wedding of actress Grace Kelly to Prince Rainier of Monaco, devoting full-page spreads to candid moments, such as a pensive Princess Grace gazing over a balcony before the ceremony and the couple exchanging rings.

Invite photojournalists to your wedding and they’ll do what they do best — record the moment with candid, humorous, touching photos. Artful images of unfettered moments have universal appeal, and these early photographs helped spark a new genre of Dallas wedding photography. Decades later this documentary approach has evolved to what it is now: a popular option in wedding photography that captures the story behind the ceremony. Today it’s available to everyone, not just celebrities, and our photojournalistic wedding photography shows it best.

Mark Kaiser, a Dallas, Texas wedding photographer, has earned a degree in fine art, but primarily photographs weddings and bridal portraits. He got into wedding photography when he took his photography hobby to some friends weddings and the feedback was always the same – “these wedding photos are better than from our professional photographer.”

Today, my years of experience help me know when a “perfect moment” is around the corner. I am poised with my camera, ready to capture that instant.

trends-02Capturing real moments on one of the most transforming days in people’s lives is what wedding photography is about for Covenant Photography of Dallas. Mark’s fine art training taught him to create images that transcend the ordinary to become amazing, so that anyone looking at his powerful wedding pictures will be moved.

Whereas traditional wedding photography follows a common script for wedding photos, a mixture of photojournalistic style takes advantage of unscripted moments in order to best tell the story.

Today, we credit brides and grooms for furthering the development of wedding photojournalism photography. “Weddings are exciting to shoot today because people are so visual now,” he says, and that carries over to location, fashion, and details, like flowers. “People want art photos. They want something better than their parent’s wedding pictures.”

Wedding Photographer Dallas allows the view to “go behind the scenes” as it were and be a true participant in the adventure and joy of covenant love called “Dallas Wedding.”

Call us at 972-822-3587 to reserve your special day.

 


Wedding Video

Using a Digital Camera at Weddings

At the wedding, the “fun factor” of digital includes instant results and the opportunity to share moments from an event while the event is still ongoing. So, without further ado, here are our Tips for Great Digital Wedding Photos.

Just like we mentioned in our companion piece, 7 Tips for Best Wedding Pictures, this article is designed to help you, the wedding guest, capture great photos with your digital point-and-shoot camera. Our goal is not to turn you into a professional Dallas wedding photographer. Rather, we’ll help you understand the issues you’ll face when you try to take digital photos at any of the affairs you’re likely to attend as a guest this wedding season.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 1:

Take plenty of camera batteries and memory cards. Due to issues with wedding flash recycling time and shutter lag that are inherent in digital cameras, you’re likely to be taking many more photos at the reception than you may think, since many of them may not come out, some one may move or blink, etc… . Consequently, you’ll be draining your camera’s batteries by not only taking the photos, but by reviewing them during the reception.

Which brings us to the second part of this tip: bringing as much memory with you as possible. The more memory cards you have with you, the less likely you’ll be to miss the party as you sit in your chair trying to find space on your card for one more picture. You know… that all important one of your best friend getting hit in the head with the bridal bouquet. The one picture you can’t possibly miss! So, plan ahead and bring more than you think you’ll need in both memory cards and batteries.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 2:

Take advantage of your camera’s ability to change ISO. Many point-and-shoot cameras are set automatically so that they expose much like a traditional camera loaded with 100 ISO film. This is great for outdoor photos, but may be woefully inadequate inside a reception hall or church even with the flash turned on. However, unlike traditional film-based point-and-shoots, many digital cameras are more sophisticated and allow the photographer to set higher ISO ratings. If you find that the backgrounds of your photos are coming out dark, even with the flash on, try boosting the ISO setting on your digital camera to 200 or 400. While you may pay for this increase in gain with some graininess, color shifts, and artifacts, you’ll find that the backgrounds will be much lighter and the on-camera flash will appear to work much better.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 3:

Don’t expect too much from your flash. Any less-than-professional on-camera flash tends to be woefully inadequate, but it’s still better than nothing. Just remember that the flash is not likely to cover a lot of distance, leaving much of the background in your photos dark. To compensate, try adjusting the camera’s ISO setting, and remember to place your subjects up close to fill as much of the frame as possible. Don’t expect to get great group shots of people dancing, particularly in dimly lit reception halls. Also, remember that flash units take time to recharge, so you are not going to be able to snap one picture after another without waiting until the camera and flash are ready.

Think ahead and plan which images are important to you so that you don’t miss the action while waiting for the flash to recharge. Finally, don’t expect red-eye reduction to work over long distances. It’s great when you’re taking static portraits (just remember to warn your subjects so that they don’t move after the first flash) but it won’t help if you’re zooming in on your subjects from half way across the room.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 4:

Account for Shutter lag. It takes time for a digital camera to capture the image and then record that image on the camera’s memory card. This is very different than traditional film cameras where there is little or no delay from the time you press the shutter until the image is recorded on film.

For action shots, the only solution is to try to anticipate the action by pointing the camera where you think the action will be and pressing the shutter before your subjects actually move into the space. Even with static subjects, such as guests posing with the bride and groom, shutter lag can result in photos where your subjects’ eyes are closed or they have weird expressions on their faces. You, and your subjects, will need to have patience while you take enough pictures to insure that you have captured some good ones. Trial and error will result in your getting some good shots. And, with all that practice, you’ll eventually develop a feel for how long your camera’s time lag is.

Digital Wedding Photography Tip 5:

Take advantage of the fact that your wedding photos are digital. You can use digital imaging programs to enhance or correct your photos. For instance, you can crop your photos to remove distracting elements or correct red-eye. Want to save an under-exposed image? Here’s a trick you might try. If the image is too dark and you have artifacts or color shifts in it, consider converting it to a grayscale black-and-white image. It’s an easy fix that will remove the unwanted color from the photo. Then, you can adjust the levels of the image, fixing the exposure. It may not work in every case, but you’ll likely resurrect a few photos you thought were unusable.

The second thing you can do with digital images is share them. Upload your photos to an online wedding gallery site and let the other wedding guests or the bride and groom look at your photos. They’ll even be able to order prints without you having to get involved. Since digital cameras produce images of varying sizes, you’ll want to resize and crop them first before uploading, making them fit standard print sizes of 4×6″ or 8×10″.

Remember to change the resolution so that your images are 300 pixels per inch to insure good prints. It’s also a good idea to make TIFF copies of all your photos before you start working with them since JPEGs degrade each time you save them.

Taking a digital camera to a wedding when you’re a guest can be fun! You don’t have the pressure that the professional Dallas wedding photographer has to get every photograph. By using a digital camera, you can see the pictures immediately, take more photos as needed and fix the ones that you have to. Even better, surprising the bride and groom with additional photos of their special day makes a great and thoughtful gift.

Contact us at 972-822-3587 to schedule your Professional Digital Wedding Photography and Bridal Portraits.

 


Wedding Video

Traditional vs. Photojournalistic Wedding Photography

There are many wedding photographers out there with different levels of professionalism. The word “Journalistic Wedding Photography” is trendy, but what does it mean? It means less formal – catching acts in the moment, spontaneity. Who wouldn’t love that? But it also means a grittier look like a news reporter, less use of flash for a more “raw feeling” to photos. That may or may not put your wedding day in the best light.

At Wedding Photographer Dallas, we offer a blend of both Traditional and Journalistic wedding photography in each of our packages. We are professional digital wedding photographers and we use on-camera flash to fill in shadows, but not dominate the picture or overpower the natural light.

For those of you who may have contacted other wedding photographers and were less than thrilled, we offer some tips for helping you make an educated and perfect decision for yourself.

Do you want a traditional-style photographer or a photojournalistic photographer? You should decide what type of “look” or “feeling” you want in your pictures.

Traditional Wedding Photography
Journalistic Wedding Photography
A traditional photographer will photograph your wedding with a general sense much similar to that of formal portraits.There will be a lot of posed shots with family and bridal party, and even moments such as the first kiss may be re-staged to get the proper image. A journalistic photographer will shoot your wedding with a general sense much similar to that of formal portraits. There will be a lot of posed shots with family and bridal party, and even moments such as the first kiss may be re-staged to get the proper image.
Photojournalistic photographers capture the wedding day with a candid approach, allowing the moments to unfold on their own, similar to the way a sports photographer captures the game as it happens. With this approach, some shots may be blurry to show motion, but virtually nothing is posed or staged with respect to any family portraits desired.

 

The Best Of Both Worlds:
Covenant Photography offers both. Yes there are the portraits and relatives and wedding party photos, but plenty of candids, laughter and dancing! Our Journalistic wedding photography side captures glances, feelings, and the anticipation on through the joy of your grand departure to the honeymoon.

Next, how much money do you want to spend? This question is actually very simple: what are your memories worth? Keep in mind you are paying for a photographer’s time, skill, and creativity — not just your finished product. Photographers’ prices have a wide range depending upon a number of factors, including where you live. Whatever the price may be, never hire a photographer based solely on price.

What type of items do you desire for your finished product(s)? Do you want an album for you and/or your family members? How about online proofing and ordering for out-of-towners who couldn’t make it to the wedding? Maybe you want all of the digital files (negatives) to have your own prints made. Find out what the photographer offers and make sure you are satisfied with what you are paying for.

Covenant Photography offers custom wedding albums, imported from Italy, covered in fine lambskin with the wedding photos collaged to beautifully tell the story of the day. There are preparation photos, ceremony photos, reception fun, and yes, the formal posed shots of family too.

These tips should help you make the right decision for you, in hopes that the rest of your wedding falls into place accordingly. It’s up to the photographer you hire to deliver the memories to you! You have to like their photos and feel comfortable with them as a person you will interact with on your Wedding day.

 


Wedding Video

What to Wear for Your Engagement Portraits

You want to wear something that you both feel comfortable in and can move around in. For pants, that usually means jeans or khakis. For tops, wear something similar, but not identical.

Pure white shirts are too easy to get overexposed in your shots, so I recommend off-whites — beige, sky blue, etc. To look nice but open and free, lots of couples like button down the front shirts that can be tucked in or untucked.

Portrait Setting

Also consider the setting of your engagement photos. Most couples want an outdoor, open park setting, preferably with some water. For Dallas engagement photography, there are some settings, each with a different feel.